Inspired by Spirit

From our churches, to medieval monasteries and abbeys to the ancient ceremonial circles, ogham script and runic lettering of our ancestors… past cultures and beliefs interpreted in silver and in gold.

Birsay Disc

Birsay Disc

This collection is derived from a small lead disc found on the Brough of Birsay in Orkney. The Brough, a small tidal island, supported a thriving metalworking industry from the 7th to the late 8th century. A rich array of brooches, rings and dress pins were found; jewellery for the prosperous Pictish community on the Orkney Mainland.

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Brodgar Eye

Inspired by a cup-and-ring stone carving found at the Ness of Brodgar in Orkney.

Cathedral

Cathedral

These superb sandstone symbol designs can be seen on the east wall of St Magnus Cathedral in Kirkwall, Orkney. The Cathedral was founded in 1137 by Earl Rognvald Kolsson and built of yellow and red sandstone. Many contemporary artists reflect on this majestic building for inspiration. Sheila has translated these symbols into her own design ideas.

Ogham

Ogham

The ancient Ogham script reads 'A Blessing on the Soul'.

Runic

Runic

The Runic Iris design was inspired by the stone age tomb, Maeshowe, built around 3,000 BC. In the 12th century Vikings broke into the tomb and carved runes on the chamber walls.

Skara Urn

Skara Urn

Inspired by the carved decoration on a potshard found at the Stone Age village of Skara Brae, Orkney

Skyran

Skyran

Skyran was inspired by the first known text discovered in Orkney. The Ogham writing that reads ‘a blessing on the soul’ was found on a whorl stone at Buckquoy, Birsay, approximately 500 AD. These signature pieces capture the rich blue-grey of the night sky, where Skyran translates as to glitter or shine brightly.

Standing Stones

Standing Stones

Inspired by the giant megaliths of the Standing Stones of Stenness. This collection compliments our Stone Circles collection inspired by the great Ring of Brodgar. Orkney's two ancient centres of power and ritual are a thousand years older than Stonehenge and lie close to each other in the Heart of Neolithic Orkney, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Stone Circles

Stone Circles

This collection hails the ancient mysteries of Orkney’s great ceremonial Ring of Brodgar.